Solar eclipse August 21, 2017

I want to share a word or two about the solar eclipse that’s happening August of this year. This is once-in-a-lifetime event. We’ve all seen solar eclipses before but we have never been in the area for totality in my lifetime.

This is a major event. It is really something that it a person should plan to see if it all possible. This time the patient the totality is going to be a mere few hours away from Joplin.

Let me quote this website. I will post another post or two about this.

Total Solar Eclipses and the Path of Totality
If the Moon’s inner or umbral shadow sweeps across Earth’s surface, then a total eclipse of the Sun is seen. —>The track of the Moon’s umbral shadow across Earth is called the Path of Totality. It is typically 10,000 miles long but only about 100 miles wide. It covers less than 1% of Earth’s entire surface area. In order to see the Sun become completely eclipsed by the Moon, you must be somewhere inside the narrow path of totality.it is rare to see one from any single location.The track of the Moon’s umbral shadow across Earth is called the Path of Totality. It is typically 10,000 miles long but only about 100 miles wide. It covers less than 1% of Earth’s entire surface area. In order to see the Sun become completely eclipsed by the Moon, you must be somewhere inside the narrow path of totality.it is rare to see one from any single location.<—–

You'd have to wait an average of 375 years to see two total eclipses from one place. Of course, the interval between seeing two eclipses from one particular place can be shorter or longer. For instance, the last total eclipse visible from Princeton, NJ was in 1478 and the next is in 2079. That's an interval of 601 years. However, the following total eclipse from Princeton is in 2144, after a period of only 65 years.

http://www.mreclipse.com/Special/SEprimer.html

The eclipse's trek through this great state is one of the more interesting, because more people will see the eclipse here by default, than at any other point along the path. That's because Kansas City and St. Louis are partially in the path of totality! That's right, even though these cities are both split in half by the path, and it would be much better for people to get out of town to get a longer time in the shadow, the truth of the matter is that many people will be at home or at work, and lots of them will see the eclipse from their homes and offices in these two great cities.

Because KC and STL are so big, and because they are split by the path, we can't give more than a passing reference to actual totality durations. Suffice it to say that you will only see a brief totality there, so if you can, get farther into the path! People in KC need to head north, and in STL, head south. Out of town, if you can, in both cases! But certainly, please try to get to the southern edge of STL, or the northern edge of KC, and see an unbelievable sight.

Recommendations for KCers: Any of the parks on the north side, like Hodge Park, would be good. Or better yet, any of the beautiful parks around Smithville Reservoir, or maybe even on a boat! Take a long weekend, and see an eclipse!

You can also head up to Liberty or Excelsior Springs for more totality. St. Joseph is right on centerline, and would be an excellent place to view from!

For St. Louis folks, just head south and west. Within 270, you can head to Jefferson Barracks or Clydesdale parks; if you can get out a little farther, then Lone Elk, Castlewood, or Greensfelder parks would be good. As close as you can get to St. Clair (SW) or Festus (S) will be all the better for the amount of time you get to see the eclipse.

As we've indicated, St. Joseph gets a whopping 2m38s of totality at 1:06:26pm! At 1:08, the shadow's southern edge will hit Kansas City, but as we've said, folks there should have hightailed themselves to Carrollton (2m37s at 1:09pm), Marshall (2m39s at 1:10pm), or Lathrop (2m30s at 1:07:45pm) for more of the show. Anyone staying behind will get a beautiful sight of Baily's Beads along the bottom of the sun's eclipsed disk. This in itself will be awe-inspiring, and will somewhat compensate for the lack of duration of totality.

Columbia gets 2m36s at 1:12pm, and the path hits its third State Capitol, on the banks of the mighty Missouri River in Jefferson City, at 1:14:19pm. State workers returning from lunch will see a 2m29s total eclipse on the steps of the Capitol building.

Continuing on through the Show-Me State, the path crosses St. Clair at 1:15:40pm (2m40s of totality). The southern part of St. Louis lies in the path, but here is one of the greatest challenges we face in getting as many people as possible to view this total eclipse: Downtown St. Louis, the Arch, Busch stadium, and Lambert airport, are NOT in the path! People here need to get south or southwest in order to see totality, and it will fall to the good people of Hillsboro (2m39s at 1:16:40pm), DeSoto (2m40s at 1:16:46pm), Union (2m37s at 1:15:33pm), St. Clair (2m40s at 1:15:40pm) and Festus (2m37s at 1:17pm), to host them! These lucky towns get lots of time in the shadow!

If you stay in those very popular central and northern parts of St. Louis that we listed above, you will not see totality. What you see (through your eclipse glasses, of course!) may look cool to you, but trust us – it will not compare to what people only a few miles south of you will experience! Head south, and see totality!

Farmington (2m12s at 1:17:40pm) lies farther south, and Cape Girardeau is in the path, but only gets 1m38s of totality, as it lies along the southern edge of the path. This occurs at 1:20:25pm.

See eclipse information for all Missouri cities and towns in the path of totality!

http://www.eclipse2017.org/2017/path_through_the_US.htm#Missouri

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